History Program

History Program

Studying the past can help improve the future of global society. History cultivates an individual’s awareness of how long-term historical causes shape the present as well as providing the ability to recognize and critique myths of the past to which we are exposed. It enhances the understanding of identity and the comprehensive range of human possibilities in our diverse global society. Most importantly, history helps to stimulate an appreciation and tolerance for cultural differences. History courses emphasize essential skills of analysis and reasoning, written and oral communication critical for professional success.

The History component’s goals are to:

  • Demonstrate the centrality of the history curriculum to the general education mission of the College;
  • Integrate the general education skills of writing effectively, reading intelligently and processing information through synthesis and analysis throughout the introductory courses of the History component; and
  • Develop students’ intellectual interest in history as a discipline and encourage student participation in the life of the department.

HIST 133 WORLD CIVILIZATION I. A general survey of the emergence of civilizations on all continents and the contributions of diverse peoples to the development of various cultures. (3) T1 GP

HIST 134 WORLD CIVILIZATION II. A general survey of the growth and changes in various civilizations on all continents and the role and causes that increasing contact between traditionally isolated peoples played in the development of the modern world. (3) T1 GP

HIST 222 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICANA STUDIES. Examines the principle features of people in the African Diaspora through examination of geopolitical context; historical themes; and, selected social, political, economic, religious, and aesthetic characteristics of both traditional and modern Africa as well as the Diaspora. It is also a multicultural focus on contemporary societies that include black people and the methodology, key issues and themes in Africana Studies. (3)

HIST 223 AFRICAN DIASPORA IN THE AMERICAS. Explores the political, economic and social experiences of people of African descent in North America, Central America, South America, and Latin America. It is an interdisciplinary survey of African descendant communities and the development and expression of African/Black identities in the context of competing definitions of “Diaspora”. (3) T1 ID

HIST 224 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY I. A survey of the African American experience in and contributions to American history from the advent of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade through the Civil War. (3) T1 ID

HIST 225 AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY II. A survey of the African American experience in and contributions to the United States since the end of the Civil War. (3) T1 ID

HIST 231 AMERICAN HISTORY I. A survey of the contributions of Native American, European, and African people to the emergence of an American nation and culture from prehistory through Reconstruction era. (3) T1 OC

HIST 232 AMERICAN HISTORY II. A survey of the developments that have had the greatest influence on the American experience since the end of the Reconstruction era. (3) T1 OC

History Faculty

Dino L. Bryant
Assistant Professor of History
B.A., University of Mexico; M.A., Jacksonville State University; Ph.D., Texas Tech University
Hermitage Hall Room 206
Saint Augustine’s University
1315 Oakwood Avenue
Raleigh, North Carolina 27610
Phone: (919) 516-4108
Email: dlbryant@st-aug.edu

Shirlkeymu L. Winston
Assistant Professor of History
B.A., M.A., North Carolina Central University; Ph.D., Howard University
Hermitage Hall Room 205
Saint Augustine’s University
1315 Oakwood Avenue
Raleigh, North Carolina 27610
Phone: (919) 516-4976
Email: slwinston@st-aug.edu