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Saint Augustine’s University was awarded a four-year grant for $600,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF)

Saint Augustine’s University was awarded a four-year grant for $600,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU UP) Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM) initiative. The grant will help relieve the financial burden of students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields.

Dr. Mark A. Melton, dean of the School of Sciences, Mathematics and Engineering, will serve as the principal investigator. Dr. Doreen Cunningham, chair of the Department of Biological and Physical Sciences and Professor Alieu Wurie, chair of the Department of Mathematics and Engineering, will serve as co-principal investigators.

According to Melton, the grant will also help S-STEM participants expand their capacity to engage in research at Saint Augustine’s University and abroad.

“This project aims to attract, support and retain highly talented students at Saint Augustine’s University in interrelated majors with an emphasis in STEM,” Melton said. “This project will advance the mission of the university through degree programs that increase student interest resulting in greater participation of African-American students in sciences.”

The program goals are to achieve full retention of talented but financially disadvantaged undergraduates majoring in the sciences, while significantly reducing their time to graduation; and increase the number of underrepresented minorities, who elect and are well-prepared to pursue advanced degrees in the sciences and pursue educational, leadership and managerial roles in STEM fields. The project targets 30 full-time Saint Augustine’s University students majoring in one of the following STEM disciplines: biology, chemistry, forensic science, engineering mathematics, mathematics, and computer science.

A rich array of opportunities will be available to the scholarship recipients including science seminar series, tutoring sessions, summer internship opportunities at on-campus and off-campus laboratories, participation in service learning activities, field trips, faculty-student collaborative research, attendance at conferences, alumni mentoring and comprehensive career counseling.

Saint Augustine’s University was also awarded a two-year grant for $200,000 from the NSF Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program Research Initiation. The grant will help expose students to ‘cutting-edge’ bench research beyond summer internships, better prepare students for the rigors of graduate studies and increase the number of underrepresented minorities that elect to pursue advanced degrees and careers in the STEM fields.

Mother Byrd travels to South Korea

University Chaplain Mother Nita Byrd will attend the 8th International CUAC Triennial in South Korea at Sungkonghoe University on July 5 to explore the theme, “Education as Hope: Working toward transformation in our common world.” The conference will provide opportunities for delegates to form relationships and network with other Anglican colleges and universities among the participating vice chancellors, presidents, chaplains and faculty.

“Recognizing that transformation occurs at the individual and community levels we will explore personal, societal and ecological transformation as we attend plenary sessions led by Anglican educators from South Korea, Liberia, New Zealand, India, the United Kingdom and the United States,” Mother Byrd said.

According to Mother Byrd, Saint Augustine’s University is a member organization in the Colleges and Universities of the Anglican Communion (CUAC) which meets every three years.

“As I travel to Sungkonghoe University this week, I am proud to represent the Falcons who reflect the essence of Christian education within the Worldwide Anglican Communion,” Mother Byrd said. “We are a Communion which values dialogue and a commitment to authentic relationships as we strive to maintain the bonds of affection among our members. Know that Saint Augustine’s University will be part of this ongoing relationship with our member colleges and universities around the world this summer.”

Mother Byrd further stated, “Saint Augustine’s University values a trilogy of behaviors that empower students to transform, excel and lead. Through our commitment to academic integrity within an atmosphere of respect and high standards, our students are not only prepared to excel in the classroom, but are also able to be the transformative agents of God’s grace in the world.”

Saint Augustine’s University awarded $200,000 grant from National Science Foundation

(Raleigh, NC) – Saint Augustine’s University was awarded a two-year grant for $200,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program Research Initiation. Dr. Mark A. Melton, dean of the School of Sciences, Mathematics and Engineering, will serve as the principal investigator. The grant will help expose students to ‘cutting-edge’ bench research beyond summer internships, better prepare students for the rigors of graduate studies and increase the number of underrepresented minorities that elect to pursue advanced degrees and careers in the a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) field.

Of the 72 research initiation proposals that were submitted to NSF for review, only 15 awards were funded.

According to Melton, the grant will also help establish a research program for undergraduate students at Saint Augustine’s University.

“The project aims to attract, support and retain students majoring in a STEM discipline and who are interested in pursuing the Ph.D. in STEM and subsequently a career in STEM research,” Melton said. “Furthermore, students will have the opportunity to conduct summer research as well as pursue research endeavors during the academic year.”

Melton and other faculty members are now conducting research in the areas of microbiology, cellular and molecular biology and genetics in the university’s newly constructed laboratory in Penick Hall. The laboratory has been set up with state-of-the-art equipment and supplies costing about $125,000 that will allow for studies in genetics, gene expression analysis, molecular & cellular biology, etc.

Melton’s research entitled Comparison of the Transcriptional Regulation of Genes Expressed in Drosophila Midline Glia and Trachea examines the regulation of gene expression during the early stages of development. This work continues an ongoing collaboration with Dr. Patricia Estes, a geneticist at North Carolina State University

.

The award starts August 15, 2014 and ends July 31, 2016.

Scholarship fund established in memory of Saint Augustine’s University Coaching Great Harvey Heartley Sr.

(Raleigh, N.C.) – A scholarship fund in memory of Saint Augustine’s University’s (SAU) all-time coaching great Harvey Heartley Sr. has been established by his family.

“We felt it was the right thing to do by establishing this scholarship,” said Harvey Heartley Jr., son of the late Coach Heartley. “My father loved this school and we want his legacy to continue. Under the new leadership of Dr. Ward and with the major task he has at hand, we wanted to help make sure that donations flood the gateways of Saint Augustine’s University.”

Heartley, 79, was a legendary figure at SAU and in the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) as an athletic director and head men’s basketball coach. As athletic director, Heartley was instrumental in the growth of the ultra-popular CIAA Basketball Tournament and the University’s athletic department.

A Raleigh, N.C., resident, Heartley played a huge role in changing the by-law to allow every team to qualify for the CIAA Tournament instead of eight teams. Under his leadership, the SAU athletic department grew from three to 13 sports during his tenure.

His illustrious credentials as an athletic director are only matched by his accomplishments as a basketball coach. Heartley is the University’s all-time winningest men’s basketball coach with 371 victories from 1971 to 1994, a span of 23 years.

Under his guidance, the Falcons reached the 1984 NCAA Division II men’s basketball national finals, making them one of three current CIAA schools in conference history to advance to the men’s national championship game. Heartley coached National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) District 26 Tournament championship teams at SAU which qualified for the NAIA National Tournament in 1977 and 1980. He led the Falcons to the CIAA Tournament championship game four times.

Heartley began his career as an administrator in athletics at Saint Augustine’s College, now University in 1971. In addition to serving as the athletic director and head men’s basketball coach, Heartley also coached several other sports and taught classes. He was the school’s athletic director from 1971 to 1996.

His achievements landed Heartley in numerous hall of fames including the CIAA Hall of Fame, the Saint Augustine’s University Hall of Fame and the N.C. Central University Hall of Fame. Heartley also received several coaching awards including CIAA Coach of the Year, CIAA Athletic Director of the Year four times and NAIA District 26 Coach of the Year.

Before arriving at SAU, Heartley was a stellar high school boys’ basketball coach. He coached state championship teams at then-Ligon High School in Raleigh, N.C. and then-Cooper High School in Clayton, N.C. An outstanding basketball player, Heartley played at N.C. Central (then known as North Carolina College) from 1951-1955 and was co-captain his final two seasons. A star in his own right, Heartley played alongside future NBA Hall of Famer Sam Jones in the backcourt during his basketball career at NCCU. A native of Clayton, N.C., Heartley played under legendary coach John B. McLendon.

An All-CIAA player in 1955, Heartley earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in physical education and education administration from North Carolina Central University in 1955 and 1965, respectively.

The funeral is scheduled for Friday, June 27, 2014, at First Baptist Church on 101 South Wilmington Street in Raleigh, N.C., at noon. The viewing will be at 11 a.m. The funeral home in charge is Barnes Funeral Home located on 325 Camel Street, Clayton, N.C.

In lieu of flowers, the Heartley family has requested contributions be made payable to the Harvey Heartley Sr. Scholarship Fund at Saint Augustine’s University. To make a donation, call (919) 516-4092.

Saint Augustine’s University reopens Tuttle Daycare Center for the YMCA of the Triangle

Today, Saint Augustine’s University reopened its Tuttle Daycare Center to expand its relationship with the YMCA. Interim President Everett Ward along with faculty and staff welcomed the campers of Camp K and YMCA representatives.

“Saint Augustine’s University has enjoyed a seven-year partnership with the YMCA of the Triangle and we are proud to expand that partnership by hosting Camp K, a camp for 4 and 5 year olds at our very own Tuttle daycare center,” said Interim President Everett Ward. “The re-opening of Tuttle is especially significant for me because as a preschooler this was my center! Things have truly come full circle.”

Doug McMillan, YMCA of the Triangle CEO, said, “The relationship between Saint Augustine's University and the YMCA of the Triangle exemplifies the spirit of community collaboration. Thanks to Saint Augustine’s University, the Alexander YMCA's Camp High Hopes has a permanent home.”

Camp High Hopes is the YMCA of the Triangle’s largest fully- subsidized outreach camp. For seven weeks, nearly 500 students will enjoy games, arts and crafts and two hot meals on Saint Augustine’s University’s campus. Camps are led by YMCA staff.

The program is offered at a reduced fee to participants thanks to public support and donations to the Alexander Family YMCA's Annual We Build People Campaign.The newest addition is the YMCA’s Camp K, a pre-Kindergarten readiness program for children ages four and five. This summer, nearly 40 children are registered. PNC supports this program and similar YMCA programs in Cary and Durham.

One of the highlights of the summer is the community collaboration called YMCA Healthy Communities Day. On July 10, the YMCA’s community health partner WakeMed and other area agencies will provide free medical screenings to more than 800 children in the YMCA’s subsidized camps. Saint Augustine’s University has played host to this event for six years.

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