Press Releases

College hosts YMCA High Hopes camp for fourth year

altThree hundred and fifty students have converged upon Saint Augustine’s University for the YMCA’s High Hopes summer camp. This is the fourth year Saint Augustine’s University has hosted the camp.

The seven-week camp serves rising first-graders through rising ninth-graders who live in the Southeast Raleigh area. The YMCA provides transportation to and from campus for the students.

The YMCA camp is one of the only camps in the area that offers physical activity as well as an educational program, said Dexter Hebert, the YMCA’s senior community outreach director. Camp participants will have access to golf, soccer, basketball, flag football and track and field clinics in addition to a reading and entrepreneurship programs. There will also be a leadership curriculum presented by the Raleigh Police Department.

The activities, meals and transportation offered through the camp would add up to about $181 per week, but the YMCA only charges $5 per week. The YMCA raises money to subsidize the true cost of the camp.

Housing the program on Saint Augustine’s University’s campus offers campers a glimpse at university life. Hebert said putting the youngsters in an environment where they see students “who look like them getting an education” helps them aspire to the same goals.

Campers aren’t the only ones reaping the benefits of the YMCA housing its program at Saint Augustine’s University. In the four years Camp High Hopes has been at the University, the YMCA has employed 100-150 St. Aug students during the summer.

About Saint Augustine’s University
Saint Augustine’s University, established in 1867, is a four-year historically black university in Raleigh, N.C. With an average annual enrollment of 1,500, the University offers 30 undergraduate degree programs in five academic divisions. Saint Augustine’s University is accredited by the Commission on Universitys of the Southern Association of Universitys and Schools.

David Shepard retires after 51 years at the College

altDavid Shepard recently retired from Saint Augustine’s University after working here for 51 years — 48 full-time and three part-time. But, Shepard’s time at the University began long before his first day of work.

Shepard was born on campus Dec. 1, 1938, at St. Agnes Hospital. And like his father, Shepard also grew up on campus. In fact, many of Shepard’s immediate family members spent time living and working on the Saint Augustine’s University campus.

It all began with his grandfather, Arthur Shepard, who worked for the University in several capacities. He kept guard as a night watchman, he fired up the boilers and kept heat in the buildings, and, as a farmer, he raised food and milked cows on campus. The dairy he helped operate was where the gravel parking lot is now behind the Martin Luther King Building.

The Shepard family lived on campus near Boyer Hall. The well they used for water is still there on the hill.

Before coming to St. Aug, Arthur Shepard lived in Asheville. The man he worked for there helped him get a job at the University.

“My granddaddy loved the University and the people that worked here,” Shepard said. “He raised his children here on campus and in the surrounding community, and all of them were in love with the University.”

Shepard’s father, Reuben, worked in what is now the Hermitage Building. Back when Reuben Shepard worked at the University, the building was the carpentry shop where he built furniture.

“When my father worked here, I loved coming back and forth here,” Shepard said. “I was excited to come here and work here as well.” In addition to his grandfather and father working at the University, Shepard’s uncle, and four of his siblings also worked here.

Shepard worked in Physical Plant, helping tend to the campus grounds and buildings. But, he also drove a bus for the University for 21 years. Throughout his time at the University, Shepard said he’s most enjoyed being able to help make university life a little easier for the students he met along the way.

“Some of them had problems, and they liked to talk to me,” Shepard said. “A lot of the time, I had experienced some things they had been through. I was able to help them. A lot of students come back now and tell me how much I helped them.”

Shepard’s philosophy is that it “doesn’t hurt to speak or to smile, or to let someone know you care.” Many people on campus will recall his familiar greeting — “Hello young lady” or “Hello young man.”

Now that Shepard’s working days at the University are done, he’s looking forward to enjoying retirement with his family, which includes nine children, 23 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. “For 48 years, I didn’t spend a lot of time with my family,” Shepard said. “I plan to visit with them and show them love.”

President Dianne Boardley Suber said Shepard left a mark “that says you were here, you gave, that you truly left it better than you found it.” “It’ll be different when you aren’t here,” Suber said. “It’ll be like a piece of history walked away.”

Elevation Baptist Church donates $5,000 to tornado relief fund

altElevation Baptist Church recently donated $5,000 to Saint Augustine's University’s Recovery and Restoration Fund. The fund is designed to help the school restore the campus to its historic beauty after a tornado tore through Raleigh on April 16, leaving devastating damage in its wake.

Elevation also gave $5,000 to Shaw University, which also suffered severe damage to its campus. The donations were presented during the culmination of the church’s youth conference, R.A.G.E. — “Reaching a Generation of Excellence.”

“The Elevation church family is committed to taking the love of Jesus Christ beyond the walls of our sanctuary and into the community,” said Dr. T.L. Carmichael Sr., pastor of Elevation, which has locations in Raleigh and Knightdale. “When we saw the damage the tornado caused to these two historic institutions, we felt compelled to do what we could to help both schools restore their campuses.”

“Saint Augustine's University appreciates the support from Elevation Baptist Church as one of our partners in the faith community,” said President Dianne Boardley Suber. “These relationships remain vital as the University continues to build its distinguished legacy.”

About Saint Augustine's University

Saint Augustine's University, established in 1867, is a four-year historically black university in Raleigh, N.C. With an average annual enrollment of 1,500, the University offers 30 undergraduate degree programs in five academic divisions. Saint Augustine's University is accredited by the Commission on Universitys of the Southern Association of Universitys and Schools.

Sigma Pi Phi donates $1,000 to tornado relief fund

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The Gamma Sigma Boule of Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity donated $1,000 to Saint Augustine’s University’s Restoration and Recovery Fund. The fund was created to help the school restore its campus in the wake of the April 16 tornado.

“We feel compelled to support our HBCUs, particularly the ones in our backyard because many of us have connections (with those schools),” said Dr. Leroy S. Darkes. “The devastation of the tornado was compelling. We had to do something.”

Darkes, the Boule’s grammateus, and Dr. George Wylie, the sire archon, came to campus to present the donation to President Dianne Boardley Suber.

“We certainly appreciate the contribution, but we equally appreciate the support and the opportunity to get you to campus and establish a long-term partnership,” Suber said.

About Saint Augustine’s University
Saint Augustine’s University, established in 1867, is a four-year historically black university in Raleigh, N.C. With an average annual enrollment of 1,500, the University offers 30 undergraduate degree programs in five academic divisions. Saint Augustine’s University is accredited by the Commission on Universitys of the Southern Association of Universitys and Schools.

Wal-Mart donates $5,000 to College's tornado relief fund

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Representatives from the Wal-Mart Distribution Supply Chain in Henderson, recently donated $5,000 to Saint Augustine's University’s Recovery and Restoration Fund. The fund is designed to help the school restore the campus to its historic beauty after a tornado tore through Raleigh on April 16, leaving devastating damage in its wake.

“We pride ourselves as being part of the community,” said Maurice Gray, Wal-Mart general manager. “As community champions, if we can lend a helping hand, we feel it’s important to do so.”

Gray said he saw the destruction the tornado caused on the news and decided the company should do something to help with the recovery. “You can either be a part of it or sit back and watch,” Gray said.

“Saint Augustine's University appreciates the ongoing support from Wal-Mart as one of our corporate partners,” said President Dianne Boardley Suber. “The strength of community and corporate relationships will be important as we continue to build our distinguished legacy.”

The check was presented at the Sisters for your Journey Diamond Scholarship Gala, which was sponsored by Wal-Mart and hosted to benefit Saint Augustine's University’s Department of Journalism and Mass Communication.

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