Press Releases

College welcomes nearly 600 first-year students

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Nearly 600 first-year students moved in to dorms on Saint Augustine's University’s campus Thursday, Aug. 11.

The move-in kicks off Falcon Welcome Week, which is designed to help new students transition to university life through a variety of activities that will prepare them for success in and out of the classroom.

"Institutionally, it is our time to acculturate our new students into the traditions, expectations, and mission of the University," said Michael P. Jackson, director of First-Year Experience. "We hope, by the end of this week, they see and feel the Saint Augustine's University community as their home away from home and as their place of work. If we pass this feeling on to them, the probability of retaining them raises exponentially."

The freshman class comprises students from throughout the United States. States represented include North Carolina, Washington, D.C., Virginia, Florida, Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado and Texas.

President Dianne Boardley Suber welcomed first-year students to the University and assured their parents that faculty, staff and administrators will do the best they can to prepare the students to be competitive in the real world. Suber told students to remain focused on the desired end — graduation.

Activities for the week include various informational sessions and seminars, and social activities to help the new students get to know one another. Welcome Week will culminate with an honor code ceremony where students will commit to academic integrity during their time at the University.

Upperclassmen have an important role in Welcome Week also. Members of student organizations help throughout the week with check-in and registration. The student organizations assisting this year are: Peer Mentors, Student Leaders, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Kappa Alpha and Delta Sigma Theta.

Saint Augustine’s College to open Confucius Classroom

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Saint Augustine’s University will officially open its Confucius Classroom at 11 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 25. The Confucius Classroom at Saint Augustine’s University is the first of its kind at a Historically Black University or University. It is one of three Confucius Classrooms under North Carolina State University’s Confucius Institute. The others are at Central Carolina Community University in Sanford and Enloe High School in Raleigh. The collaboration between Saint Augustine’s University and N.C. State primarily provides an opportunity for students to learn Chinese language and culture.

The Confucius Classroom and courses offered through it will be open to all Saint Augustine’s University students.

For more information about Confucius Classrooms, visit http://oia.ncsu.edu/confucius/confucius-classrooms.

Saint Augustine’s College Educational Talent Search receives nearly $405,000

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The Saint Augustine's University Educational Talent Search Project has been selected to receive funding from the federal Department of Education. The college’s Educational Talent Search Project will receive a $404,981 grant for the budget period of Sept. 1, 2011, through Aug. 31, 2012. The program will be funded for five years.

The Educational Talent Search is one of the federal TRIO programs created by President Lyndon B. Johnson as part of his War on Poverty. TRIO programs include Upward Bound and Student Support Services, which is known as Academic Achievers at Saint Augustine's University.

The goal of Educational Talent Search is to provide students with the information and the tools they need to apply for and enroll in higher education. Saint Augustine's University’s program, which was established in 1970, serves low-income and first generation university students in Edgecombe, Nash, Halifax, Martin, Franklin, Vance, Warren and Northampton counties.

Ninety percent of the seniors who come through the program enroll in a two- or four-year college, or a trade school, said Antonio Stephens, director of the Upward Bound and Educational Talent Search programs.

Brandi Whitaker, a senior at Rocky Mount Senior High, and Xavier Bunch, a sophomore at Rocky Mount Prep, both say they feel they have an edge over their peers because they’ve participated in TRIO programs.

“(The program) taught me that I can’t be lazy,” Whitaker said. “You have to be determined, even if that means getting up early on a Saturday or giving up your summers.”

Bunch said he already knows he wants to major in business administration and work with computers like his dad. He said the program has taught him he has to be dedicated.

“If you are going to make a good life, you have to work hard,” Bunch said.

“Saint Augustine's University is committed to educating and preparing a new generation of leaders and change agents,” said President Dianne Boardley Suber. “The efforts of the Upward Bound and Educational Talent Search programs are in line with the University’s mission, and renewed funding from the Department of Education allows us to continue offering this valuable service to young people in northeastern North Carolina.”

About Saint Augustine's University
Saint Augustine's University, established in 1867, is a four-year historically black university in Raleigh, N.C. With an average annual enrollment of 1,500, the University offers 30 undergraduate degree programs in five academic divisions. Saint Augustine's University is accredited by the Commission on Universitys of the Southern Association of Universitys and Schools.

Photo caption: Rocky Mount Prep sophomore Xavier Bunch says the Upward Bound program has given him an edge over his peers in his university preparation.

City of Raleigh and Saint Augustine’s College develop long-range plans for development of Southeast Raleigh

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On Monday, July 18, 2011, Dr. Dianne Boardley Suber, president of Saint Augustine’s University, along with senior-level university administrators, joined City of Raleigh Planning Staff to work on a long-range development plan for Southeast Raleigh. The day-long planning session was spearheaded by Mitchell Silver, Raleigh Planning Director, and the Executive Director of the Saint Augustine's University Community Development Corporation, Dennis Davis.

This planning session provided comprehensive direction for the long-term growth of the areas around Saint Augustine's University. “The fact that the city requested the University’s input shows the respect that the University is receiving for its community development efforts. We look forward to playing a significant role in the re-birth of Southeast Raleigh,” said Dianne Boardley Suber. This meeting was the first in a series of meetings that will take place over the coming months to discuss long-term development plans.

Through Saint Augustine’s University’s Community Development Corporation, the University continues to build on the success of the completed Cooke Street project, in which Saint Augustine’s University constructed and sold 14 houses to first time home buyers. The program was such a success that Saint Augustine’s University received the “Sir Walter Raleigh” award for the quality of its construction. The planning session was held at the city’s Urban Design Center.

About Saint Augustine’s University
Saint Augustine’s University, established in 1867, is a four-year historically black university in Raleigh, N.C. With an average annual enrollment of 1,500, the University offers 30 undergraduate degree programs in five academic divisions. Saint Augustine’s University is accredited by the Commission on Universitys of the Southern Association of Universitys and Schools.

Union of Black Episcopalians, city of Norfolk establish scholarship in honor of Rev. Joseph Green

altThe Union of Black Episcopalians and the city of Norfolk established a scholarship in honor of the Rev. Dr. Joseph Green, a 1949 Saint Augustine’s University graduate. The endowment fund was announced during a special tribute to Green at the Union of Black Episcopalians 43rd Annual Meeting and Conference, held June 27-July 1 at the Marriott Norfolk Waterside Hotel in Norfolk, Va.

The scholarship was established to honor Green’s contributions to the Episcopal Church and the Hampton Roads community. Green, who is a member of the University’s Board of Trustees and a former chaplain at the school, was pastor of Norfolk’s Grace Episcopal Church for 30 years before retiring in 1994.

Green has been a force in the community. He served four years on the Norfolk School Board, 20 years on the Norfolk City Council and 10 years as the vice mayor of Norfolk. Green was instrumental in establishing Tidewater Community University’s Norfolk campus, on which the administration building was named in his honor in 2009.

“Rev. Green has made significant contributions to the Saint Augustine’s University community as well as the Hampton Roads area,” said President Dianne Boardley Suber. “He serves as a wonderful role model for our students and is truly a living example of what we are teaching our students – to be change agents in their communities.”

About Saint Augustine’s University
Saint Augustine’s University, established in 1867, is a four-year historically black university in Raleigh, N.C. With an average annual enrollment of 1,500, the University offers 30 undergraduate degree programs in five academic divisions. Saint Augustine’s University is accredited by the Commission on Universitys of the Southern Association of Universitys and Schools.

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